Raspliner Weisse Brewing and Fermentation

Preparing to rack on raspberries

Preparing to rack on raspberries

I actually brewed this batch back in July. I’ve been wanting to brew another Berliner Weisse again for a few months, especially with summer in full force. My last batch came out really well, so I decided to retrace my footsteps. I botched a few things last time, like forgetting to add the hops, so I wanted to make sure I did things exactly right this time.

I started out by making a starter for the lactobacillus. I again chilled the starter wort to about 90F then added the bacteria and held it at that temperature for a day before brewing. On brew day I followed an identical process as the previous time. I did a no-boil with a multi-step rest and a decoction to step up the temperature. The mash schedule and recipe can be viewed here.

I chilled the beer to about 90F and added the starter with the lactobacillus to give it a head start. After a day I added the yeast and put it inside my fermentation chamber regulating the temperature at about 68F for a week. That weekend I picked up 5 pounds of local raspberries from a farm and froze them. Freezing the fruit breaks down the cell walls which adds more flavor to the beer. I tossed in the frozen berries and racked the beer on to them after a week of fermentation.

Berliner Weisse fermented with raspberries

Berliner Weisse fermented with raspberries

I let the beer sit for an additional week to get flavor, aroma, and color from the fruit. The raspberries were sucked dry. Nearly all of the color was sucked out of them, in fact they were white when it was all said and done. After a week on the raspberries I bottled the beer shooting for approximately 3.5 volumes of carbonation. I wanted to go slightly lower than the last batch because of gushing if the bottle wasn’t opened immediately after being pulled from the fridge. The final gravity ended up hitting 1.000. Stay tuned for my tasting notes.